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6 High-Paying Jobs for Tech Beginners

6 High-Paying Jobs for Brand New Techies

 
“Entry-level” often evokes images of overworked, underpaid, underappreciated workers “putting in their dues” and gaining experience so that they can eventually move into better positions and advance their careers. For someone fresh out of school, entry-level jobs can be a big step up from internships, but for someone who wants to switch careers, an entry-level job can feel like a huge step backward.

And so often, when you’re setting out on a new career path, you already have obligations and responsibilities. You can’t start making barely more than minimum wage and expect to maintain the lifestyle you have. You need an entry-level job that pays more like middle management in other industries.

Here’s the thing: entry-level tech jobs are usually really good jobs, and a lot of them pay well from the start. They’re not the kinds of entry-level jobs you get with nothing but a high school diploma. Instead, they’re for people who have some education (formal or not) and skills, but maybe only have a year or two of experience (and often that experience is from side hustles or student projects). They’re a necessary stepping stone if you’re looking for a great career in tech.

Entry-level tech jobs are awesome because they can be a ton of fun, too! You’ll get new challenges all the time, and often have a chance to think and act creatively. And what’s better than getting the experience you’ll need to move up, while being well-paid to do so?

When you’re looking at the job requirements for an entry-level position, you might see a lot of listings that “require” 3-5 years of experience. And you’re probably thinking to yourself, “How is this an entry-level position if they want me to have years of experience?!”

I’ll let you in on a little secret: job “requirements” and “qualifications” are kind of like a wish list of the perfect candidate. They’re not the bare minimum of the qualifications the person hired will actually have. So when you see 3-5 years experience, or a laundry list of programming languages you should be an expert at, think less about whether you have those skills or experience right now, and think more about whether you feel capable of performing the job as a whole. Then, make sure you emphasize the skills you do have, and how those skills make you the best candidate.

Here are six entry-level jobs in tech that are a great way to get started on a new career path. None of them require a ton of experience, but all of them pay an average salary of at least $50,000 (and some companies might pay a lot more than that).

Digital Marketing Manager

Digital marketing managers are in charge of digital and social media marketing for a company or brand. They focus mostly on increasing sales, brand awareness, and customer loyalty. They often manage all of the company’s customer-facing online presence, including websites, social media profiles, advertising, and other communications.

Digital marketing managers are also on the front lines of discovering new avenues for digital promotion. When new sites, platforms, and technologies are released, it’s their job to assess whether they might be a good marketing solution for the brand.

The tech skills you’ll need for a digital marketing manager position include a familiarity with search engine optimization (SEO) and marketing (SEM), experience with conversion tests and experiments, and proficiency with marketing database apps, email, social media, and online advertising.

Median salary is approximately $64,000 per year according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Digital Marketing Manager, EatStreet (Madison, WI)

Digital Strategist

Digital strategists collaborate with other team members on the long-term goals and strategy of a brand. They create the strategy for the brand, along with recommendations for the specific methods that can be used to implement that strategy. It’s a great position for someone who’s innovative and enjoys collaborating with others. They often work very closely with the marketing team, as well as sales and product teams.

If you want to become a digital strategist, you’ll need a few tech and digital skills, mostly along the lines of online advertising, creating HTML emails and email marketing, metrics and analytics programs, and social networking.

Median salary is approximately $63,000 per year according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Digital Strategist, R&R Partners (Las Vegas, NV)

Content Marketing Manager

Content marketing managers handle the marketing-focused content of a brand, including writing blog posts, newsletters, white papers, and sometimes social media posts that align with the company’s strategy. They also promote that content, often in collaboration with others on the marketing team.

Being able to consistently come up with new and innovative ideas for content and how to promote it is a vital skill that content marketing managers need to possess. It’s also handy if you have some basic HTML and CSS skills (for creating email campaigns as well as formatting blog posts and articles), as well as WordPress skills, since there’s a good chance that’s what you’ll be publishing content with (WordPress is by far the most popular content management system (CMS) out there).

Median annual salary is approximately $61,000 according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Content Marketing Manager, Bounce Exchange (New York, NY)

Web Developer

Web developers create the code that powers websites and web apps. They work with programming languages including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby on Rails, PHP, and Python. They also maintain and scale sites as they grow and evolve over time. Some developers work alongside designers, while others take on both roles. Being able to interpret designs and implement them according to the designer’s specifications is a vital skill that developers need to have, regardless of what type of coding language they’re working in. Developers often have tight deadlines to meet, so enjoying a fast-paced environment is a must. Check out our Beginner’s Guide to Landing a Junior Developer’s Job.

Median annual salary is approximately $55,000 according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Junior Web Engineer (Front End), Apartment Therapy Media (Remote)

Data Analyst

Data analysts collect data and information to find insight on specific topics. Data is often collected through surveys, metrics, and other methods, and then analysts compile the data, interpret it, and present it in more user-friendly formats (like charts or infographics). It’s also their job to identify where improvements might be made to processes based on hard data, and to identify trends in data they collect.

Data analysts usually need to be proficient with databases, programming languages like JavaScript or XML, and data mining and segmentation processes. Design skills are also handy, since presenting your findings in an easy-to-understand way is vital.

Median annual salary is approximately $53,000 according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Data Analyst – Women’s Health at Grady, Emory University (Atlanta, GA)

Digital Analyst

Digital analysts collect, analyze, and interpret digital marketing data. They create and identify key performance metrics, and quantify how effective different approaches are. They also often engage in A/B testing, customer feedback and research, and other marketing data collection. Good digital analysts have a mix of business and marketing skills, technical skills, and analytical skills.

Digital analysts need to have a thorough knowledge of metrics apps like Google Analytics, as well as tools for A/B testing and customer research. Basic HTML and CSS skills are also handy, since it makes testing much more streamlined (since minor changes don’t have to be done through a designer or developer).

Median annual salary is approximately $51,000 according to PayScale

Apply right now:
Digital Analyst, Carrot Creative (Brooklyn, NY)

 
We all have to start somewhere when embarking on a new career, but thankfully the starting point in tech is usually pretty great! There’s no need to take giant steps backward in terms of income just because you want to take a new path.

 

Cameron Chapman

Cameron is a staff writer here at Skillcrush, and spends most of her time writing and editing blog posts and Ultimate Guides. She's been a freelance writer, editor, and author for going on a decade, writing for some of the world's leading web design and tech blogs. When she's not writing about design, she spends her time writing screenplays and making films (and music videos for rock and metal bands!) in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom.

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One сomment

  1. Surya Replied

    Dear One,
    Nice and Realistic Writing on the issue. Thanks for your view.

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